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Monday, November 28, 2016

In for the winter

Although it's not really cold here yet, the nights are dipping into the 40s, so we decided over the weekend that it was time to bring the outdoor plants inside for the winter. Luckily, we have a huge picture window on the front of the house, which provides the perfect spot for some filtered sun.

This collection of plants includes some that were used in many mid-century homes in the 1950s and 60s, including a rubber plant, palm, and philodenron.


Bringing the outdoors in...literally


Follow these links to older posts on plants that create an authentic mid-century look:

4 comments:

  1. I love that picture window Dana. The plants are gorgeous and so healthy.I have a couple of potted lemon trees outside our door. I'm debating on whether or not to bring them inside. It's dipping down into the 40's here too but I have so little space inside and the trees really filled out this summer. I love seeing bits and pieces of your home. It is really lovely.

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    1. We have a large yucca on the front porch that will stay outside, since it winters well in Texas. I understand what you mean about limited space. This is the first time we've really had a place to bring in our plants for the winter without being crowded out of house and home. We're still working on the house. This redo has been slow, and there are still several things that need to be done before we photograph everything. I'm glad you've liked what you've seen so far.

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  2. Such a great picture window. Looking beautiful. I don't get good indoor light, so think I need to get a snake plant (aka mother in laws tongue), also popular as a mid century plant. All those plants must have been tolerant of cigarette smoke, right? :)

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    1. I have a snake plant in my bedroom, which doesn't get much light, and it's thriving. We haven't decided on new window treatments, and the existing, ancient roller shades no longer roll, so they stay pulled down most of the time. I honestly don't know how plants did so well back then with all the cigarette smoke fall-out. I remember the brown film it would leave on car windshields and walls, so I'm sure that the plants were covered with it too. Yuck...can't believe I smoked all those years.

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