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Friday, March 11, 2011

Lotte lamps

Gunnar Bostlund was trained at the Technical University of Denmark, and his wife Lotte studied at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts and the Danish School for Arts and Crafts. Their first factory produced technical ceramics, specifically porcelain insulators. In 1952 the factory was destroyed by fire and the young couple emigrated from their native Denmark to Canada.

At that time, Gunnar and Lotte started producing art pottery, primarily vases, teapots and salt and pepper shakers. They produced their first lamp in 1956, and son Morten introduced the wound fiberglass shade in the early 60s. Eventually the factory employed all the Bostlund children. While the company started in Canada, it expanded to Batavia, New York and then to Holley, New York. Many of the early designs were hand-painted or carved by Lotte or other members of the family.

Lotte lamps are an original mid-century modern product line, with two of the original three lamps still in production, using the same plaster molds and glaze techniques as their first lamps. Morten Bostlund transferred the company in 1997 to Victor and Laura Aume, another couple with a passion for ceramics and design. Victor has studied art and engineering at Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Institute of Art. The Aumes live in Circleville, Ohio, where they produce Lotte lamps in their barn.
 
From lottelamps.com



Lotte applying a design to a lamp
lottelamps.com

Morten wiring a lamp
lottelamps.com

Storefront window of Georg Jensen's on Fifth Avenue in New York in 1962
lottelamps.com

vandm.com

thefabulousfind.ca

1stdibs.com

1stdibs.com

Some of the current Lotte Lamp colors
lottelamps.com

14 comments:

  1. I've always loved Lotte lamps. I think the simple and elegant designs can make huge statements.

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  2. I love them too, old and new. It would be wonderful to find a cache of vintage ones somewhere, but in the meantime, we've ordered several of the new ones to carry in the store.

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  3. Hmmm I swear I've seen ones like the two photos of the short, squat kind on eBay. Didn't know they were important.

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  4. @1950sarh: They do show up on eBay fairly often. In fact, there are 4 auctions now, ranging from $150 for a single with some damage to $750 for a pair in excellent condition. If you ever see any cheap, scoop them up and make a bundle reselling them.

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  5. i have always liked these lamps..but their price scared me each time i thgt of buying them... :)

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  6. @Sudha: Yes, the vintage ones can be very, very pricey, but two of the original styles are still being made from the old molds and in some of the original glazes. They are fairly reasonably priced...about like any good lamp at a furniture store.

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  7. I was given an original one from the 60s by my in-laws last Christmas! I always admired it when we stayed in their guest bedroom, and not knowing what else to get me - they gave me the lamp! It has the original shade with the various colours of threads running through it. Do the new ones have the same type of shades?

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  8. sorry, I meant various natural 'shades' of threads.

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  9. @Reduce, Reuse and Rummage: What wonderful in-laws! I'd be thrilled with that as a Christmas gift. Does yours have the horizontally wound fiberglass shade or a linen shade? They make both in white, natural and brown jute.

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  10. I love your history lessons and those are just so freaking cool. <3

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  11. They are gorgeous! And so well made.

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  12. @VintageHunter: Welcome to my blog! I love seeing new people comment. And, yes, they are lovely, high quality lamps.

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